Supply & Demand

Quite recently, we had the builders in so to speak, to transform our garage space into a utility room and small office for this writer and blogger to tap the keys at all hours. They, the builders, were here much longer than expected so after several weeks of Fair Trade news, served up in my largest cafetière, I decided to economise, and purchased two large jars of Nescafé Original. Now as a keen, retired professional photographer, I used this stuff as an ingredient for developing black and white films (I kid you not), in the process known as Cafenol processing.

As I’ve not been out shooting with my Nikon’s of late, the coffee was given out in large cups, mostly with a good helping of full cream milk and three to four spoons of sugar, to the excellent team who finished after weeks of delay and bad organisation. In the meantime, I tried a few cups myself, and although it would be nowhere near my First choice for an instant moment, it wasn’t as bad as I remembered it to be. I took mine black with no sugar, usually with a glass of ice water to dissipate the aftertaste. The last jar is nearly empty, so once finished, there will be no more on my coffee shelf. 

It’s not terrible my any means, but over the last 15-20 years, I’ve been exposed to so many classic coffee tastes that a jar of Nescafé Original, just doesn’t do it for me anymore. If it ever did in the first place.

 

 Purchased from my local newsagent for an ingredient of Cafenol film developing, The Nescafé Original blend must be consumed by millions the world over each and every day. But not by me anymore.

Purchased from my local newsagent for an ingredient of Cafenol film developing, The Nescafé Original blend must be consumed by millions the world over each and every day. But not by me anymore.